IMPORTANT INFORMATION

-48 HOUR PRESCRIPTION ORDER POLICY
-ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY TOWARDS ALL STAFF NO ABUSE WILL BE ACCEPTED
-UNREASONABLE DEMANDS ON SPECIFIC CLINICIANS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AS PER PRACTICE POLICY

IMPORTANT PRACTICE INFORMATION

THERE IS A 48 HOUR PRESCRIPTION ORDER POLICY WITHOUT EXCEPTION – SEE LINK ZERO TOLERANCE POLICY TOWARDS ALL STAFF – NO ABUSE WILL BE ACCEPTED UNREASONABLE DEMANDS ON SPECIFIC CLINICIANS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED AS PER PRACTICE POLICY

Emergency

Emergency

In cases of emergency where immediate medical attention is required call 999 or attend your nearest Accident and Emergency Department.

Phone First

Make sure you PHONE FIRST before going to Antrim or Causeway Hospital Emergency Departments, or Mid Ulster Hospital Minor Injuries Unit. Get directed to the right care. Avoid busy waiting rooms. Stay safe and save time.

Phone First’ is for patients (including children):

  • who are unwell and considering travelling to Antrim Area or Causeway Hospital Emergency Departments (EDs) or the Mid Ulster Hospital Minor Injuries Unit
  • with an injury or illness which requires urgent treatment but is not immediately life threatening.

Telephone: 0300 123 1 123

Text relay number: 18001 0300 123 1 123 or Interpreter Now app.

Further information about Phone First

Emergency healthcare advice

Emergency healthcare advice is available from nidirect.

Examples include:

  • Chest pain (suspected heart attack)
  • Suspected stroke
  • Suspected meningitis
  • Anaphylactic shock (severe allergy)
  • Heavy bleeding or deep lacerations
  • Fluctuating levels of consciousness or completely unconscious
  • Difficulty breathing or stopped breathing with a change in colour
  • New seizure, fit or uncontrollable shaking
  • A child with fever and lethargic (drowsy)
  • A feverish and floppy (unresponsive) infant
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sudden, severe abdominal pain
  • Accidental or intentional overdose of medication
  • Trauma (including falls) and possible broken bones or road traffic accident.

What happens if I call 999?

If it’s a genuine emergency, where someone is seriously ill or injured and their life is at risk, call 999 and don’t panic.

Once you’re connected to a call handler, you’ll have to answer a series of questions to establish what’s wrong, such as:

  • Where are you (including the area or postcode)?
  • What phone number are you calling from?
  • What has happened?

This will allow the operator to determine the most appropriate response as quickly as possible.

Dialling 999 does not necessarily mean an ambulance will be dispatched. The call handler will decide what’s appropriate.

It may be safe enough for you to be seen elsewhere, or you can be given telephone advice by a medically trained clinical adviser.

An ambulance will be sent if it’s a life-threatening emergency.